Social Media and Healthcare
805.5K views | +6 today
Follow
Social Media and Healthcare
Articles and Discussions on the  intersection of Social Media and Healthcare. Relevant to Healthcare Practitioners, Pharma', Insurance, Clinicians, Labs, Health IT Vendors, Health Marketeers, Health Policy Makers, Hospital Administrators.
Curated by nrip
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The tricky parts of medicine are hard - Work together

The tricky parts of medicine are hard - Work together | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Googling does not mean I think I’m a doctor. It’s a sign of being an engaged, empowered “e-patient.” 

partner with great doctors – I don’t tell them what to do. And they welcome me doing it.

I personally am completely opposed to a patient going in and saying “I’ve decided I have condition X, and I want you to prescribe 42mg QID of medication Y.” I mean, have you ever seen the things medical students have to learn to get their license??

But I’m all in favor of a patient saying, “I have symptoms A and B, and from what I can tell from websites J and Q, that sounds like it could be M.” Explain your thinking, identify your source, and try to solve the diagnostic puzzle together: Collaborate

The flip side is that it’s demonstrably wrong for a doctor to insist that their diagnosis must be right; 

And to flip it again, patient engagement isn’t a synonym for “the patient is always right.”

Googling is a sign of an engaged patient. The only reason a patient ever searches for information is because they’re trying to learn more! To smack that down is to discourage engagement. 

That’s empowering. That’s modern. That’s participatory. Do it that way.

The tricky parts of medicine are hard. Work together.

read this classic and evergreen post at
https://participatorymedicine.org/epatients/2015/11/the-truth-about-the-your-googling-and-my-medical-degree-mug.html

 

nrip's insight:

I have shared this excellent post by Dave several times previously. This is a reminder to everyone to continue treating patients in moda collaborata as we hope to arrive at a post-covid era soon. A ton of unresolved issues will be brought forth, a number of symptoms swept under the carpet over the past year are going to be looked at. Unfortunately all that a number of  these patients may have done over the rough year gone by will have been to use google to try and figure out what can it be and ask a doctor friend to advice them medicines.

No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

How Mobile Channels Improve Patient Engagement and Outcomes

How Mobile Channels Improve Patient Engagement and Outcomes | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

It’s time for healthcare organizations to make bigger investments in mobile patient engagement.

 

The past year’s pandemic struck a painful blow to health organizations’ pre-COVID patient engagement efforts. There are now fewer patient visits amidst coronavirus fears and stay-at-home orders.

 

People are simply not going into clinics to address non-COVID medical needs. The result is more serious health issues developing, such as cancers being found at later stages and chronic conditions advancing beyond easy treatment options.

 

As patient engagement strategies ramp up, mobile communication channels are becoming more attractive for reaching those living in geographically isolated areas, far from their medical providers.

 

While video visits have replaced many non-urgent in-person visits, those in rural areas struggle to use even telemedicine options due to lack of access or unreliable broadband connectivity. The travel is too far and the technology is not part of their daily lives making healthcare completely out of reach. 

 

Because most people own a cell phone, mobile is an ideal way to communicate and elicit collaboration for health.

 

Healthcare systems that leverage mobile channels are finding this platform a powerful way to serve patients.

 

Text (SMS) is an ideal channel for reaching underserved communities, as one does not need a smartphone or broadband to send or receive SMS messages.

 

SMS also provides a quick and easy way for patients to send information back to their doctors about side effects related to the vaccines. Moving beyond one-way communication with SMS gives patients a way to ask questions or relay information on their current health status.

 

To take things beyond basic SMS, healthcare providers can consider fleshing out a full mobile communications strategy to deliver tailored analytics. With real-time data and services, staff work-flow can be improved and resources can be allocated more efficiently, also lowering costs. It’s the next step up from SMS but patients with chronic conditions who have mobile access to medical portals showed improved self-management and an increase in regular contact with their care team. 

 

read the entire piece at https://hitconsultant.net/2021/04/29/mobile-channels-improve-patient-engagement-outcomes/#.YIt7UOvhUf0

 

nrip's insight:

Its high time every physician, clinic and hospital, looks at incorporating mobile apps in their way of practicing medicine. Most have already started using it as a means of communication owing to the pandemic. Use that as a stepping stone into exploring the world of mobile touch points between patients and care providers, enhance your websites to be mobile friendly, or personalized mobile apps.

No comment yet.

Would you like me to help you with your Social Media Activities?

Please fill this form and I will get in touch with you
* Mandatory fields