Social Media and Healthcare
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Social Media and Healthcare
Articles and Discussions on the intersection of Social Media and Healthcare.
Relevant to Healthcare Practitioners, Pharma', Insurance, Clinicians, Labs, Health IT Vendors, Health Marketeers, Health Policy Makers, Hospital Administrators.
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Have you heard the one about disease awareness?

Have you heard the one about disease awareness? | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

New digital techniques, novel patient-centered healthcare services, and innovative approaches to communicating health issues are set to take the healthcare sector by storm asit begins to embrace the latest IT revolution.


“Compared with many other industries, pharma is still far behind in terms of harnessing the power of IT for consumer engagement and marketing purposes,” says Dr Emre Basar, a healthcare professional who is also an expert on digital communications. He speaks to eyeforpharma ahead of this presentation at the Multichannel Marketing Conference. 


What’s more, pharma companies need to run pretty fast to catch up if they want to be successful players in this landscape, according to the Medical Science Liaison for Rigosertib at Baxter International. “If pharma waits too long, global technology leaders such as Apple or Google and smaller internet firms will penetrate this growing market,” he predicts.


Patient empowerment is a key trend


“Digitization of the healthcare market will lead to empowerment for patients,” he stresses. “In the past, patients were very dependent on their doctors. Nowadays, patients are pretty well-informed and hence become more and more empowered.”


Patient empowerment will be enhanced by the spread of wearable technology. “Patients will be more independent. Pharma needs to address this trend because it is also a huge market opportunity for them.”


Disease awareness

outlining a disease as a story by combining a narrative structure with visual elements is “much more compelling than a 'simple' disease information website".


- See more at: http://social.eyeforpharma.com/digital/have-you-heard-one-about-disease-awareness#sthash.0NWhybpB.dpuf



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How Twitter can be used to address specific health issues

How Twitter can be used to address specific health issues | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

A new study led by Jenine K. Harris, PhD, examined the use of the hashtag #childhoodobesity in tweets to track Twitter conversations about the issue of overweight kids.


The study noted that conversations involving childhood obesity on Twitter don't often include comments from representatives of government and public health organizations that likely have evidence relating to how best to approach this issue. The authors think maybe they should.


Twitter use is growing nationwide. In its 2014 Twitter update, the Pew Research Center found that Twitter is used more by those in lower-income groups, which traditionally are more difficult to reach with health information.


While younger Americans also are more likely to use Twitter, it is used equally across education groups and is used more by non-white Americans than whites.


This, Harris said, is one of the reasons Twitter is an avenue that the academic and government sources with accurate health information should consider taking advantage of in order to reach a wide variety of people.


"I think public health so far doesn't have a great game plan for using social media, we're still laying the foundation for that," she said. "We're still learning what works.


"Public health communities, politicians, and government sources -- people who really know what works -- should join in the conversation. Then we might be able to make an impact," she said.

more at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710151723.htm


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askdrmaxwell's curator insight, July 14, 2014 6:09 PM

Do you use social media for your health questions and research? 

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Google releases findings on how to spot fake reputation builders

Google releases findings on how to spot fake reputation builders | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it
Those who build fake social media followers, YouTube views, and backlinks can't hide for long.


Modern snake-oil salesmen who want to boast exaggerated popularity on social media or e-commerce websites will happily pay freelancers to inflate their reputation. Google, Twitter, and Facebook, however, make their money based on the reliability of their websites, and so Google has now released findings on how to automatically spot these purveyors of fake reputations, or “crowdturfers.”


“Automatically detecting crowdturfing gigs is an important task because it allows us to remove the gigs before buyers can purchase them, and eventually, it will allow us to prohibit sellers from posting these gigs. To detect crowdturfing gigs, we built machine-learned models using the manually labeled 1,550 gig dataset,” wrote a team of researchers in a recently presented paper, which was partly supported by a Google Faculty Research Award. A Google Research blog post yesterday highlighted the work.


Freelancing micro-task websites, such as Odesk, Fiverr, and Freelancer have built a cottage industry out of globally distributed part-time workers. I’ve used these sites for research help and email list building. Nonprofit Samasource uses similar systems to help impoverished women and youth find work.


These sites offer great services. But fake reputations make them less trustworthy.


Their machine-learning detection system has a pretty high rate of accuracy, based on the researchers’ own dataset. “Our experimental results show that these models can effectively detect crowdturfing gigs with an accuracy rate of 97.35 percent. Using these classification models, we identified 19,904 crowdturfing gigs in Fiverr, and we found that 70.7 percent were social media targeting gigs, 27.3 percent were search engine targeting gigs, and 2 percent were user traffic targeting gigs.”


Eventually, they hope their technology will help companies such as Twitter automatically ban bots and fake followers. You can read the full paper here.


more at http://venturebeat.com/2014/07/09/google-releases-findings-on-how-to-spot-millionaire-fake-reputation-builders/



In case you'd like help with Genuine Reputation Management on the World Wide Web, Contact us via @nrip on Twitter ,  https://www.facebook.com/plus91.in on Facebook or visit our website at http://www.plus91.in

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Top Hospital Marketing Priorities for 2014

Top Hospital Marketing Priorities for 2014 | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Hospital marketing executives and administrators ranked marketing for various service lines as “extremely important” (65.5%) or “very important (24.1%), among respondents to the recent Healthcare Success Strategies (HSS) survey.


Although service lines have generally commanded an important position in the marketing mix, Heart & Vascular Services ranked as the clear leader. It’s likely that the promotional emphasis during coming months will shakeout with the following priority, according to survey takers:


Having High Priority:

  • Heart & Vascular Services (65.5%)
  • Orthopedics (51.7%)
  • Cancer Care (50.0%)
  • Women’s Health (46.3%)

Having Low Priority:

  • Sleep Disorders (53.5%)
  • Geriatrics (48.1%)
  • Digestive Disorders (32.1%)
  • Children’s Health (29.6%)
Rate your most successful marketing channels for service lines.

When it comes to getting the message out, hospital marketing efforts routinely employ a wide range of communications tools. When asked to rank those that are among the “most successful,” respondents told us:

  • Physician Liaison marketing (43.3%)
  • Publicity (32.2%)
  • Community Events (29.0%)
  • Print advertising (19.3%)
  • TV advertising (16.1%)
  • Organic online ranking via SEO (12.9%)
  • Radio advertising (12.9%)
  • Internet paid search advertising/remarketing (12.9%)
  • Direct mail (9.6%)
  • Social Media (6.4%)
  • Online directory sites (3.2%)
  • Online display advertising on other sites (3.2%)
  • Outdoor advertising (0%)
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Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds

Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Monitoring social media websites like Twitter could help health officials and providers identify in real time severe medical outbreaks, allowing them to more efficiently direct resources and curb the spread of disease, according to a San Diego State University studypublished last month in the Journal of Medical Internet Research,Medical News Today reports.


Study Details


For the study, lead researcher and San Diego State University geography professor Ming-Hsiang Tsou and his team used a program to monitor tweets that originated within a 17-mile radius of 11 cities. The program recorded details of tweets containing the words "flu" or "influenza," including:


  • Origin;
  • Username;
  • Whether the tweet was an original or a retweet; and
  • Any links to websites in the tweet.


Researchers then compared their findings with regional data based on CDC's definition of influenza-like illness.

The program recorded data on 161,821 tweets that included the word "flu" and 6,174 tweets that included the word "influenza" between June 2012 and the beginning of December 2012.


According to the study, nine of the 11 cities exhibited a statistically significant correlation between an uptick in the number of tweets mentioning the keywords and regional outbreak reports. In five of the cities -- Denver, Fort Worth, Jacksonville, San Diego and Seattle -- the algorithm noted the outbreaks sooner than regional reports.

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John Mark Bwanika's curator insight, December 7, 2013 5:13 AM

Research on social media......

Drew Hodges's curator insight, February 19, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a cool article to show the real life change that social media is creating. Before it was stated that it would take up to two weeks to detect an outbreak of a disease but now with social media it can be done in a day. 

This article really shows how social media is becoming a part of our everyday life and is taking on roles that we probably didn't expect it to. 

However with the number of users increasing it is important to have tools that help us monitor the large amount of data that is present. 

Its no good having all this information if we cannot harness it's true potential, like the one illustrated in this article for disease break out.

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An Exploratory Infodemiology Study on Electronic Word of Mouth on #Twitter About Physical Activity in the US

An Exploratory Infodemiology Study on Electronic Word of Mouth on #Twitter About Physical Activity in the US | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Twitter is a widely used social medium. However, its application in promoting health behaviors is understudied.


In order to provide insights into designing health marketing interventions to promote physical activity on Twitter, this exploratory infodemiology study applied both social cognitive theory and the path model of online word of mouth to examine the distribution of different electronic word of mouth (eWOM) characteristics among personal tweets about physical activity in the United States.


This study used 113 keywords to retrieve 1 million public tweets about physical activity in the United States posted between January 1 and March 31, 2011. A total of 30,000 tweets were randomly selected and sorted based on numbers generated by a random number generator. Two coders scanned the first 16,100 tweets and yielded 4672 (29.02%) tweets that they both agreed to be about physical activity and were from personal accounts. Finally, 1500 tweets were randomly selected from the 4672 tweets (32.11%) for further coding. After intercoder reliability scores reached satisfactory levels in the pilot coding (100 tweets separate from the final 1500 tweets), 2 coders coded 750 tweets each. Descriptive analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Fisher exact tests were performed.


Results: Tweets about physical activity were dominated by neutral sentiments (1270/1500, 84.67%). Providing opinions or information regarding physical activity (1464/1500, 97.60%) and chatting about physical activity (1354/1500, 90.27%) were found to be popular on Twitter.


Approximately 60% (905/1500, 60.33%) of the tweets demonstrated users’ past or current participation in physical activity or intentions to participate in physical activity. However, social support about physical activity was provided in less than 10% of the tweets (135/1500, 9.00%). Users with fewer people following their tweets (followers) (P=.02) and with fewer accounts that they followed (followings) (P=.04) were more likely to talk positively about physical activity on Twitter.


People with more followers were more likely to post neutral tweets about physical activity (P=.04). People with more followings were more likely to forward tweets (P=.04). People with larger differences between number of followers and followings were more likely to mention companionship support for physical activity on Twitter (P=.04).


Conclusions: Future health marketing interventions promoting physical activity should segment Twitter users based on their number of followers, followings, and gaps between the number of followers and followings.


The innovative application of both marketing and public health theory to examine tweets about physical activity could be extended to other infodemiology or infoveillance studies on other health behaviors (eg, vaccinations).


more at http://www.jmir.org/2013/11/e261/

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Can Social Media Expand the Audience For Medical Research Articles

Can Social Media Expand the Audience For Medical Research Articles | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it
The use of social media tools, for the purpose of releasing an article in the clinical pain sciences, increases the number of views and downloads


The use of social media tools – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and ResearchBlogging.org – for the purpose of releasing an article in the clinical pain sciences increases the number of people who view the article and download it. Social media tools also have implications for the dissemination of medical research articles in other fields.


Problem


Generally, anyone interested in accessing research articles either utilizes a research database such as Pubmed or simply follows a few specific journals. As a result, many articles go unnoticed because end users who could benefit from them lack the time to find them. In addition, those who have time to search these databases may be overwhelmed with lots of articles that are not relevant to their needs.


Approach to Address Problem


The researchers selected 16 PLOS ONE articles using four inclusion criteria relevant to the clinical pain sciences, first published online between 2006 and 2011, of interest to readers of a research group blog (bodyinmind.org), and not previously mentioned in a blog post on bodyinmind.org. The articles were assigned randomly to four researchers who wrote blog posts on them, comprised of approximately 500 words and a link to the online version of the article. These blog posts were randomly assigned two dates: one date for a social media release and one date as a control. The control is not well explained by the researchers and appears to represent a period where nothing is being done to promote the article.

Innovation


The key innovation in this research project was the use of social media to push research information to end users instead of waiting on the end users to “pull” the information from a database.


Key Results


The key result was a statistically significant increase in HTML views and PDF downloads one week after the blog posts when comparing the control date and the social media release date  (p < .05). However, none of the measures of social media reach, engagement, or virality related to the outcome variable. Hence, some other unknown factors are affecting HTML views and PDF downloads.


Implications for clinicians/health care system


Better dissemination of research can save clinicians time by improving the efficiency of information uptake by them. This is useful for health care systems because this is one of the many ways that a health system can improve its quality. One of the challenges is making sure that the information coming from social media is well catered to the needs of clinicians.


Implications for public health

Improved dissemination of research could also provide benefits to the public. In the case of patients or lay individuals, social media can be used to send not only research articles, but lay translations of the information in order to increase the probability of more people understanding the information. This can contribute to increasing health literacy of individuals.
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The Science of Getting New Twitter Followers

The Science of Getting New Twitter Followers | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Follower count is, unanimously, the biggest indicator of success on Twitter. Some people may contend with that statement. They may argue that quality of followers, quality of tweets, level of engagement, etc. are far more important success metrics.  


However, a lot of people are, without a doubt, influenced by the number of followers somebody has. Having a huge follower count is kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy. People see you have a lot of followers, assume your tweets must be extra-special or you must be extra-special and follow you, thus increasing your follower count further.  


So, what really gets you more followers? You will find articles aplenty online that tell you how to get more followers on Twitter. Why, I have written quite a few myself.   


But this post is different.  


This post does not rely on experience, observation, commonly held beliefs, guesswork or any other abstract factors to tell you where Twitter followers come from and how to get and keep them. This post is based entirely on scientific analysis and facts – numbers, stats, hard-to-refute conclusions. So, let’s get going.  


Scientifically, these are the factors that influence how many twitter followers a particular account can amass:  

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Here's The Simple Secret To Apple's Marketing Success

Here's The Simple Secret To Apple's Marketing Success | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. — Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, 1939


When did marketers start assuming that the way to stand out amidst loud and flashy advertising methods was to be even louder and flashier? We’re faced with increasing evidence, statistics, and research findings indicating that consumers are tired of being bombarded with extraneous information, which distracts rather than assists them in their buying decisions.


According to research done by CEB, the most effective way to reach consumers isn’t through elaborate and complex websites, ads or sales copy, but rather through simplifying the decision making process: in other words, presenting exactly what consumers need to know, while leaving out the rest. In fact, they found that companies who simplified and streamlined the decision making process for their customers were 86% more likely to make a sale.


The key to modern marketing? Simplicity.


more at http://www.forbes.com/sites/jaysondemers/2014/07/08/heres-the-simple-secret-to-apples-marketing-success/




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8 quick tips for live-tweeting a healthcare conference

8 quick tips for live-tweeting a healthcare conference | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it
Tips for live-tweeting a conference: Be timely, be original, be insightful. Two healthcare industry Twitter enthusiasts made this infographic to help.
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Online Database of Healthcare Social Media Policies

Online Database of Healthcare Social Media Policies | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Healthcare social media policies from the largest online database of social media policies.


Superb curation worth bookmarking for all #hcsm enthusiasts  http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php?f=4

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Amanda Wall's curator insight, November 6, 2014 10:23 AM

Recently in class we have been learning about the importance of a social media policy and how important they are to a company. This article has separate links to each individual company featured within the website and in return gives us access and insight into their Social Media Policy's.  Some of the well-known companies they feature are: Kodak, FedEx, American Red Cross and Apple

 

I think that it is important that all employees are made aware that these policies exist and aren't skipped over like an "I agree to the terms of service" button on most websites. Most people don't usually take the time to read these agreements, therefore, the should be short and to the point. A verbal as well as written agreement should be made between employers and employees. Or even Professors and Students. 

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Should Hospitals be on Facebook?

Should Hospitals be on Facebook? | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Across industries, sophisticated organizations are now committing both time and money to their social media marketingcampaigns. But the healthcare industry (including hospitals, B2B medical manufacturers, and health clubs) has hesitated to embrace social media.


A survey of 1,060 U.S. adults by the PwC Health Research Institute found that one-third of respondents considered social media platforms appropriate for the discussion of healthcare. The Journal of Internet Medical Research found that 60% of adults surveyed used the Internet to access medical information. This is a major opportunity – it’s time to get ahead of the curve.


Here's how healthcare institutions can engage on social in a relevant, useful, industry-appropriate way.


Use Images

In a study by Infinigraph, we measured the effectiveness of different posts made by healthcare companies, including hospitals, clinics, and health care foundations. We found that healthcare audiences engaged most with posts containing images.


Keep it Human, Keep it Useful

Some of the most engaged-with Facebook posts contain images, and all link to valuable content. These short posts link to larger articles which tell human interest stories, tapping into audience emotions, or provide useful health information.


A Few Best Practices for Healthcare Marketers

  • Make your data available. Allow your ratings and reviews, as well as error rates within your database (if applicable) to be made public.
  • Educate your employees on social media policies. Make the risk of violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) clear, and prohibit posting inappropriate information about doctors or patients.
  • Implement privacy settings. Be sure to safeguard personal information and content.
  • Avoid using social media channels to communicate with patients on sensitive issues. Advise them on a secure, personalized server.
  • Enlist at least one author, editor, or reviewer on every piece of content that you publish. Include references or links to the source of your content, and date it whenever possible.
  • Include an “About Us” or “History” section on your website. Present information about qualified staff, services, and facility as well as your purpose, goal, or mission.
  • Ask for audience feedback through surveys and questionnaires. Make your contact information easy to find, and encourage your audience to get in touch via email, Facebook, and Twitter. When they do reach out, respond promptly and thoughtfully.


Curated from http://blog.marketo.com/blog/2013/11/should-hospitals-be-on-facebook-social-media-marketing-for-the-healthcare-industry.html



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5 tips to create a strong social media presence

5 tips to create a strong social media presence | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it


1. Focus your content. Find your niche.

We live in a world where purpose matters.


2. Create consistent themes.

If people like what they see, they'll come back for more.


3. Give your content a branded look.

If people share your image by uploading it to Facebook or another social media site, make sure you own it.


4. Have a flexible content calendar.

Follow the two-stream content method:


- One stream of content is planned.

- The second stream of content is based on listening in real-time to what's going on in your niche and around the Web.


5. Post what the audience likes-and wants to share.


Read more at: http://www.healthcarecommunication.com/Main/Articles/11549.aspx

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Social Media Policies for Physicians: Good or Bad!

Social Media Policies for Physicians: Good or Bad! | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Social media guidelines for physicians frequently focus on the need for doctors to separate their personal from their professional identities, but those types of policies get social media all wrong, according to a viewpoint recently published in JAMA.


Instead, the viewpoint's authors suggest a simpler, more straightforward means for physicians to assess potential social media activity: Is what you're about to say appropriate for a doctor to talk about in public?


"When a physician asks, 'Should I post this on social media?' the answer does not depend on whether the content is professional or personal but instead depends on whether it is appropriate for a physician in a public space," write the authors - Matthew DeCamp, MD, PhD; Thomas Koenig, MD; and Margaret Chisolm, MD - from Johns Hopkins University.


But for those who remain unconvinced, the authors offer these four reasons why, for physicians, it simply isn't feasible to separate personal and professional identities:It's operationally impossible: With minimal effort and information, anyone can do a web search that quickly connects a physician's personal content to her professional content - assuming both types of content exist. And if both types of content do exist, there's no way to keep them separated, when a connection between the two is just a Google search away.


Lack of user consensus: Despite recommendations from groups such as the American College of Physicians and the Federation of State Medical Boards, some physicians remain unconvinced of the need to maintain separation between personal and professional content. For some, blurring the lines between the two is part of the reason to use social media in the first place, as doing so can level hierarchies and increase transparency, the authors say.


They're often the same thing: Separating personal and professional identities is inconsistent with the concept of professional identity. In other words, professional identify is determined to at least some extent by personal identity. For example, medical students undergo identity changes from student to professional and from consumer of medical services to provider.


Those personal identity transitions help shape who they are as professionals. "When recommendations fail to acknowledge the complex, mutable nature of professional identity and its connection to personal identity, the recommendations fail to offer the unambiguous, practical guidance that is needed," the authors write.It could be harmful: Doctors aren't required to avoid personal contact with patients offline, so why should they be required to do so when they're using social media?


In small or rural communities in particular, such encounters can be unavoidable, and they can even be beneficial to both doctor and patient. The unrealistic expectation that physicians need to maintain two separate identities can carry with it a "psychological or physical burden," the authors write.The authors stress that they aren't proposing that doctors should "eliminate boundaries," or that "anything goes" on social media.


Rather, the key to resolving physicians' "online identity crisis" lies in recognizing that social media exist in primarily public spaces, not in exclusively professional or exclusively personal ones

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