Social Media and Healthcare
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Social Media and Healthcare
Articles and Discussions on the intersection of Social Media and Healthcare.
Relevant to Healthcare Practitioners, Pharma', Insurance, Clinicians, Labs, Health IT Vendors, Health Marketeers, Health Policy Makers, Hospital Administrators.
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For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions

For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital are working on ways to help patients better understand their chances of suffering heart attacks and surgical complications.


 Karen Sepucha. runs the Health Decisions Sciences Center at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital. A few years ago she surveyed primary care physicians, and asked how confident they were in their ability to talk about numbers and probabilities with patients.

"What we found surprised us a little bit," Sepucha says. "Only about 20 percent of the physicians said they were very comfortable using numbers and explaining probabilities to patients."


Doctors, including Leigh Simmons, typically prefer words. Simmons is an internist and part of a group practice that provides primary care at Mass General. "As doctors we tend to often use words like, 'very small risk,' 'very unlikely,' 'very rare,' 'very likely,' 'high risk,' " she says.

But those words can be unclear to a patient.


"People may hear 'small risk,' and what they hear is very different from what I've got in my mind," she says. "Or what's a very small risk to me, it's a very big deal to you if it's happened to a family member."


Simmons and her colleagues are working on ways to involve their patients in shared decision-making. The initiative at Mass General gives patients online, written and visual information to help them. One of the goals is to make risk understandable — bridging the gap between percent probabilities and words.


more at http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/07/24/333719559/for-better-treatment-doctors-and-patients-share-the-decisions


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CQC to search for patient feedback on GPs using Facebook and Other Sites in UK

CQC to search for patient feedback on GPs using Facebook and Other Sites in UK | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

The CQC will search for positive and negative comments about GP services on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, in order to discover the ‘reality’ of the care that patients are receiving, said the regulator today.

Launching a document which lays out their strategy and purpose for the next three years in response to the report into the failings identified in the Francis Inquiry in Mid Staffordshire Foundation NHS Trust, the regulator said it wanted to ensure they were responding to patient concerns more effectively.

The report also said it would introduce a ‘more robust’ test for new primary care providers applying for registration, although a CQC spokesperson confirmed that GP practices that have already registered would not be affected by the new process.

 

It also said that a proposed chief inspector of primary and integrated care will look at patients’ experiences as they move between different services. Jeremy Hunt announced in February that he was considering plans for a chief inspector to provide an ‘expert view’ of primary care to mirror the appointment of chief inspectors for hospitals, to uphold standards and make the final call when a practice is failing.

 

As Pulse revealed last week, the report also said when inspecting providers, practices will be judged on five domains, with inspectors asking whether practices are safe, effective, caring, well-led and responsive to people’s needs.

The CQC said it will develop new fundamental standards focusing on these five areas, although a ‘judgement’ element will be introduced to avoid ticking the box, but missing other factors.

 

They confirmed that the frequency of inspections will increase as the perceived risk of harm to patients increases. The regulator said it will also develop a series of ‘triggers’ which will allow it to predict future problems with services, and allow it make better decision about when, where and what to inspect.

 

The report also re-iterated a commitment to a better use of information, meaning information sources such as the ‘Friends and Family Test’  and reviews carried out by others will be used to inform their regulatory work.

The CQC strategy said: ‘We will make it easier for people to tell us about the reality of the care they receive and we will improve how we respond to and report on how their views and experiences have informed our work. We will focus on gathering the views of people in the most vulnerable circumstances.

‘We will search for both positive and negative comments on what is being said about services, including social media (for example, Facebook and Twitter) and other digital media such as or website. We will make sure that the full potential of the results of the ‘Friends and Family Test’ and other similar information is used in our work.’

 

It added that they will consider working with other agencies to carry out inspections, and will work with NICE to make sure they are clear about the measures used in assessments.

 

David Behan, CQC chief executive, said: ‘People have a right to expect safe, effective, compassionate, high quality care. CQC plays a vital role in making sure that care services meet those expectations.

 

‘We recognise that quality care cannot be achieved by inspection and regulation alone – that lies with care professionals, clinical staff, providers and those who arrange and fund local services – but we will set a bar below which no provider must fall and a rating which will encourage and drive improvement.

 

In developing our plans for the next three years we have looked closely at what we do and listened to what others have told us, to make sure we focus on what matters to them. The plans also take account of Robert Francis’s report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust and the response by the Secretary of State for Health.’

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3 Ways To Increase Your Hospital’s Facebook Engagement

3 Ways To Increase Your Hospital’s Facebook Engagement | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

The healthcare industry is finally catching up with the rest of the business world in expanding their social media offerings. Many in our industry are worried about social media due to HIPPA and other regulatory concerns. Those fears are slowly subsiding as a recent study published by the Journal of Medical Internet Research said 58% of the physician respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and that 60% stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. Many physicians and hospitals want to know how they can increase engagement within their Facebook community.  Here are three simple proven tactics that will increase your EdgeRank and engagement on Facebook.


People love photos, it’s human nature as we’re naturally visual beings. The proof really lies in the pudding of Pinterest which is a photo heavy platform and continues to explode in popularity. HubSpot confirmed this theory in late 2012 showing that Facebook posts with a photo generated 53% more engagement than posts without a photo.


Fill-in-the-blank posts are a great way to build up your EdgeRank. These posts are easy to engage with and allow your community to show of their creativity. It doesn’t take much thought or context on part of your followers to comment therefore you should see much higher engagement and a higher EdgeRank score for your page. When using this tactic you’ll often see the comments outnumber the likes.


This basic marketing principle isn’t lost in the social media world. People need clear instruction on what you expect them to do. It still takes great content and a cleverly written post for you to get a conversion, but a call to action has shown to a critical element in increasing post engagement. Below is an example of a great photo of a nurse interacting with a sick infant in a neonatal ICU in Colorado Springs, CO. The photo is cute and heart warming, plus it has a beautiful infant in it. Both are huge pluses when it comes to engaging content! With a clear call to action the post did extremely well.

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Social Media and Patient Advocacy via @nrip

An advocate is a “supporter, believer, sponsor, promoter, campaigner, backer, or spokesperson.Social media is not an activity it's a strategy. Using this strategy with Patient advocacy is what this talk by Nrip Nihalani is about
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Boosting Facebook Engagement for your Medical Practice

Boosting Facebook Engagement for your Medical Practice | Social Media and Healthcare | Scoop.it

When it comes to social media, the name of the game is engagement. After all, what good are all of those fans and followers if they don’t care about or pay attention to what you’re doing?  Just last month, my team and I guided one of our orthopaedic clients into the top ten national “medium-sized” companies competing to win the Social Madness Competition presented by The Business Journals.


Below are some of the strategies we employed to become the “little orthopedic practice that could.”

Identify Your Facebook Target Demographic


Be sure to determine your Facebook page’s demographics before attempting to craft your messaging.

When your office utilizes social media, whom exactly are you trying to reach? If you just say, “Patients,” you haven’t looked into your page insights deep enough. By clicking on the “People” tab you’ll get a top-level overview of who your followers are – gender, age and even location. This information is key when crafting your messaging, as you wouldn’t have the same message for an 18 year-old-male that you would for a 64-year-old female. For this client, we target 35-44 year old females using key imagery and posts that appeal to the mom demographic.

Find Your Most Successful Post Types

Facebook is great for communicating with patients in part because it’s so versatile. You can post a myriad of topics and ideas that appeal to your specific fanbase and Facebook will keep track of how successful each post is for you. For free. Photos, status updates, links, videos – post some of each to find out which ones resonate with your fans. We’ve found that photos generally work best from an engagement standpoint – both in terms of clicks and interactions (“likes”, “comments” and “shares”).  After photos, our most successful results have come with status updates, followed by links and then videos.

Create Interesting Content That Fits Your Successful Post Types

A snapshot of the Facebook reach and engagement levels for one of our clients.

Sounds easy, right? For the most part it is (though it gets a little more difficult when competing against the top companies in the country for months on end, but I digress). If photos work well, be sure to plan ahead and have some fun, creative ones scheduled for the month. Remember, Facebook – and social media as a whole – is supposed to be personal, so not everything has to just be an office photo with a doctor. Those are great and they shouldn’t be ignored; however, don’t feel like you can’t put up a crazy themed photo or a popular meme, too. When updating your status, let people know what’s going on in your office. Having a staff appreciation day? Show your fans your office has some personality. Happy it’s Friday? Tell the world. Odds are, they are, too.

We’ve also found that our followers really enjoy posts that relate to charitable giving and those that ask them questions while presenting facts. For example, come up with a statistic that relates to your practice and have your followers fill in the blank. Or, ask them to answer a true or false question about something you treat in your office. It may sound silly, but simple exercises like this will get people engaged, and it will get them to share the content with their friends and family (i.e. potential new patients).

The End Result

Ultimately, engagement should be your goal with social media, not click through rates to your website. Social media is your way to become more than just a medical practice to your patients. It’s your way to become a part of their lives outside of the office.

As an added benefit, when done correctly, you’ll see benefits within your practice walls as well. For example, just within the contest period alone, we had several patients tell us they scheduled an appointment with the practice because they found them on Facebook or saw a post their friend “Liked”. We were also able to schedule at least one surgery, thanks to someone finding the practice on, you guessed it, Facebook. Thanks to an increase of more than 800 page likes, we were also able to exponentially grow the practice’s organic reach to thousands of potential patients in just a few short months without spending a dollar. It’s all about engagement.

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